Basic Rendering Mechanism
Matestack’s rendering mechanism takes care of converting Ruby into HTML:
div class: "card shadow-sm border-0 bg-light", foo: "bar" do
img path: "...", class: "w-100"
div class: "card-body" do
h5 "foo", class: "card-title"
paragraph "bar", class: "card-text"
end
end
will be rendered to:
<div class="card shadow-sm border-0 bg-light" foo="bar">
<img src="..." class="w-100">
<div class="card-body">
<h5 class="card-title">foo</h5>
<p class="card-text">bar</p>
</div>
</div>
That's working because matestack-ui-core defines all kind of Ruby methods targeting Rails ActionView tag helper, rendering the desired HTML tag and content as a String. This enables you to build a well known DOM structure while writing and utilizing pure Ruby!
As you can see, you can add CSS classes and ids as well as custom tag attributes. This way matestack-ui-core can be combined with various CSS frameworks, your custom styles and all kinds of reactivity systems.
It’s already fun to write pure Ruby instead of HTML or any other templating engine syntax but this approach is really paying of, when you start using Ruby's language features in order to split your UI implementation into various small chunks, organized through included modules, class inheritance or simply multiple Ruby methods within one class!
The above shown Ruby code lives in Ruby classes inheriting from Matestack::Ui::Component, Matestack::Ui::Page or Matestack::Ui::Layout - they are described in the following sections of these docs and might look like this:
class Components::HelloWorld < Matestack::Ui::Component
def response
div class: "my-class" do
plain "hello world!"
end
end
end

Supported HTML Tags

Void Tags

These tags by definition do not allow an inner HTML and therefore do not take an block but all kinds of tag attributes, e.g.:
# ...
hr class: "some-class"
# ...
  • area
  • base
  • br
  • col
  • hr
  • img | you can use src or path in order to reference the url to the image
  • input
  • link
  • meta
  • param
  • command
  • keygen
  • source

Tags

The following tags take content via a block OR first (non-hash) argument and all kind of tag attributes, e.g.:
# define inner HTML via a block
span class: "some-class" do
plain "foo"
end
# OR: define inner HTML via a simple first non-hash argument
span "foo", class: "some-class"
# ...
  • a | you can use href or path in order to reference the url of the link
  • abbr
  • acronym
  • address
  • applet
  • article
  • aside
  • audio
  • b
  • base
  • basefont
  • bdi
  • bdo
  • big
  • blockquote
  • body
  • button
  • canvas
  • caption
  • center
  • cite
  • code
  • col
  • colgroup
  • data
  • datalist
  • dd
  • del
  • details
  • dfn
  • dialog
  • dir
  • div
  • dl
  • dt
  • em
  • embed
  • fieldset
  • figcaption
  • figure
  • font
  • footer
  • form
  • frame
  • frameset
  • h1 | also available via heading size: 1
  • h2 | also available via heading size: 2
  • h3 | also available via heading size: 3
  • h4 | also available via heading size: 4
  • h5 | also available via heading size: 5
  • h6 | also available via heading size: 6
  • head
  • header
  • html
  • i
  • iframe
  • ins
  • kbd
  • label
  • legend
  • li
  • main
  • map
  • mark
  • meter
  • nav
  • noframes
  • noscript
  • object
  • ol
  • optgroup
  • option
  • output
  • paragraph | p is not working as it's an alias for puts in Ruby core
  • picture
  • pre
  • progress
  • q
  • rp
  • rt
  • ruby
  • s
  • samp
  • script
  • section
  • select
  • small
  • span
  • strike
  • strong
  • style
  • sub
  • summary
  • sup
  • svg
  • table
  • tbody
  • td
  • template
  • textarea
  • tfoot
  • th
  • thead
  • time
  • title
  • tr
  • track
  • tt
  • u
  • ul
  • var
  • video
  • wbr

Text Rendering

In order to render plain text, do:
#...
plain "hello world!"
# "hello world!" alone would not be rendered!
#...

Tag/Data Attributes

Matestack's rendering mechanism automatically renders all given options as tag attributes. For convenience, data attributes can be passend in within a data hash:
div class: "foo", id: "bar", hello: "world", data: { foo: "bar" } do
#...
end
<div class="foo" id="bar" hello="world" data-foo="bar">
<!-- ... -->
</div>

Custom HTML Tags

If you want to use HTML tags which are not supported by Matestack's rendering mechanism by default, you can call ActionView's tag helper manually:
plain tag.xyz("foo")
will render:
<xyz>foo</xyz>